How it all started…

In 2003 Bill Wood met a young lady named Patty Kempf. Patty had cerebral palsy and had difficulty moving her hands. She explained to Bill that she enjoyed reading very much, but now she had to use a pencil in her mouth to turn the pages. She asked Bill if he could come up with a better way to read her books.  Bill and Patty had both fun and frustrating times as they developed and perfected his design. Bill told us working with Patty filled him up are excitement and energy than anything else.

About  the same time, another gentleman named Bill Deimling was working on adapting some assistive devices for a family member with a similar illness. His therapist told Bill “You know, I know another guy that is doing similar things. Maybe you should meet.” The two Bills began helping each other, and one day while Bill Wood was at Bill Deimling’s factory picking up some parts, Bill Sand bumped in to them, and the idea of creating commercial grade assistive devices for the people they knew was born. Soon after their discussion all three met at LaRosa’s to solidify their new mission. That night over dinner they came up with the name and shortly begain a word-of-mouth advertising campaign introducing themselves as “May We Help”.

Sadly, Bill Wood passed away  in the fall of 2010. The number of people he assisted is too many to count, and his commitment and vision will be sorely missed. However, because of his dedication and enthusiasm we now have over one hundred volunteers and hundreds of completed projects in our portfolio.

Meet the Bills

Our Future Together

We could not be more excited to be doing what we are doing right now.  And we realize that in spite of how excruciatingly challenging it is to live with a disability of any kind, it is a fact that there has never, in all of human existence, been a better time to live with a disability than right now!  Technology has come so far in such a short amount of time and we are riding a wave of epic proportions.

We hope to be a part of the new reality for people living with disabilities, where resources and ideas are shared globally in an instant, where even the slightest physical movement a person can control is able give access to transportation and communication and deeper relationships with others, where you are never alone when you need specific and unique help to be and remain independent.